My Comedy MaryJane’s History Segments 2016


My Comedy MaryJane’s History Segment’s 2016

January








February




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*New* How To MIME ,by MaryJane




IMG_20140131_200724 mj mime ht pic

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Part1 how to create your own Mime– How To Everything from Make-Up technique to The Act
part2 is a short film titled “Mime On The Loose In Paris” a example of The Act of A MIME enjoy and create your own unique character

th8JKEFX9H mime mask happy sad
200px-Chaplin_A_Dogs_Life
th33BDL9ZL mime mask200px-Jean_+_Brigitte_Soubeyran_Im_Zirkus
mime noun
1. the art or technique of portraying a character, mood, idea, or narration by gestures and bodily movements; pantomime.
2. an actor who specializes in this art.
3. an ancient Greek or Roman farce that depended for effect largely upon ludicrous actions and gestures.
4. a player in such a farce.
5.mimic

3287 powder10 creme makeup
basic makeup cream white foundation whitw or no color powder blacl cream makeup/eyeliner and detail brush design your own unique look… ask for setting spray at your local make up specialty store(I highly recommend it )

 

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A mime artist (from Greek “μίμος”—mimos, “imitator, actor”) is someone who uses mime as a theatrical medium or as a performance art, involving miming, or the acting out a story through body motions, without use of speech. In earlier times, in English, such a performer would typically be referred to as a mummer. Miming is to be distinguished from silent comedy, in which the artist is a seamless character in a film or sketch.
The performance of pantomime originates at its earliest in Ancient Greece; the name is taken from a single masked dancer called Pantomimus, although performances were not necessarily silent. In Medieval Europe, early forms of mime such as mummer plays and later dumbshows evolved. In early nineteenth century Paris, Jean-Gaspard Deburau solidified the many attributes that we have come to know in modern times—the silent figure in whiteface.
Jacques Copeau, strongly influenced by Commedia dell’arte and Japanese Noh theatre, used masks in the training of his actors. Étienne Decroux, a pupil of his, was highly influenced by this and started exploring and developing the possibilities of mime and developed corporeal mime into a highly sculptural form, taking it outside of the realms of naturalism. Jacques Lecoq contributed significantly to the development of mime and physical theatre with his training methods
In film
:Chaplin_A_Dogs_Life.jpgA Dog’s Life (1918). Chaplin
Prior to the work of Étienne Decroux there was no major treatise on the art of mime, and so any recreation of mime as performed prior to the twentieth century is largely conjecture, based on interpretation of diverse sources. However, the twentieth century also brought a new medium into widespread usage: the motion picture.
The restrictions of early motion picture technology meant that stories had to be told with minimal dialogue, which was largely restricted to intertitles. This often demanded a highly stylized form of physical acting largely derived from the stage. Thus, mime played an important role in films prior to advent of talkies (films with sound or speech). The mimetic style of film acting was used to great effect in German Expressionist film.
Silent film comedians like Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton learned the craft of mime in the theatre, but through film, they would have a profound influence on mimes working in live theatre decades after their deaths. Indeed, Chaplin may be the most well-documented mime in history.
Mime has been performed onstage, with Marcel Marceau and his character “Bip” being the most famous. Mime is also a popular art form in street theatre and busking. Traditionally, these sorts of performances involve the actor/actress wearing tight black and white clothing with white facial makeup. However, contemporary mimes often perform without whiteface. Similarly, while traditional mimes have been completely silent, contemporary mimes, while refraining from speaking, sometimes employ vocal sounds when they perform. Mime acts are often comical, but some can be very serious.
Greek and Roman mime
The first recorded pantomime actor was Telestēs in the play Seven Against Thebes by Aeschylus. Tragic pantomime was developed by Puladēs of Kilikia; comic pantomime was developed by Bathullos of Alexandria.
The Roman emperor Trajan banished pantomimists; Caligula favored them; Marcus Aurelius made them priests of Apollo. Nero himself acted as a mime