Ep#30 HowTo Apply FullFashion Nylons Blind Folded TMJS


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“HowTo” A Story! TMJS ep25

HowTo-A Story…

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Act 1 establishing the characters & the world they live in as well as the chalenges they will face.(the more bizarre the world the more explanation needed.Act 1 ends with the protagonist accepting the challenges presented in Act1. + 5W’S

1.who =A character is a person in a narrative work of arts (such as a novel, play, television series or film). Or a intertaining or capitivating individual

2.what = A Story is communication, The history of communication dates back to prehistory, with significant changes in technologies evolving in tandem with shifts in political and economic systems, by extension, systems of power. Communication can range from very subtle processes of exchange, to full conversations and mass communication. Human communication was revolutionized with speech approximately 100,000 years ago. Symbols were developed about 30,000 years ago, and writing about 5000 years ago.

3.when & 4.where = time and geographic location in which a story takes place, and helps initiate the main backdrop and mood for a story. Setting has been referred to as story world or milieu to include a context (especially society) beyond the immediate surroundings of the story. Elements of setting may include culture, historical period, geography, and hour.

5.why = A Story is communication, The history of communication dates back to prehistory, with significant changes in technologies evolving in tandem with shifts in political and economic systems, by extension, systems of power. Communication can range from very subtle processes of exchange, to full conversations and mass communication. Human communication was revolutionized with speech approximately 100,000 years ago. Symbols were developed about 30,000 years ago, and writing about 5000 years ago.

Act 2 referred to as “rising action”, typically depicts the protagonist’s attempt to resolve the problem initiated by the first turning point, only to find him- or herself in ever worsening situations. Part of the reason protagonists seem unable to resolve their problems is because they do not yet have the skills to deal with the forces of antagonism that confront them. They must not only learn new skills but arrive at a higher sense of awareness of who they are and what they are capable of, in order to deal with their predicament, which in turn changes who they are. This is referred to as character development or a character arc. This cannot be achieved alone and they are usually aided and abetted by mentors and co-protagonists.

Act 3 features the resolution of the story and its subplots. The climax is the scene or sequence in which the main tensions of the story are brought to their most intense point and the dramatic question answered, leaving the protagonist and other characters with a new sense of who they really are.

History of Story’s
In spoken language analysis an utterance is a smallest unit of speech. It is a continuous piece of speech beginning and ending with a clear pause. In the case of oral languages, it is generally but not always bounded by silence. Utterances do not exist in written language, only their representations do. It can be represented and delineated in written language in many ways. Cuneiform script is one of the earliest known systems of writing,distinguished by its wedge-shaped marks on clay tablets, made by means of a blunt reed for a stylus. and came into English usage probably from Old French cunéiforme.
Wrihting is a large part of comunication. The early writing systems that emerged in Eurasia in the early 3rd millennium BC was not a sudden invention. Rather, it was a development based on earlier traditions of symbol systems. These systems may be described as proto-writing. They used ideographic or early mnemonic symbols to convey information yet were probably devoid of direct linguistic content. These systems emerged in the early Neolithic period, as early as the 7th millennium BC.

Proto-writing was The 1st. form of comunication after speaking.Tortoise shells were found in 24 Neolithic graves excavated at Jiahu, Henan province, northern China, with radiocarbon dates from the 7th millennium BC. According to some archaeologists, the symbols carved on the shells had similarities to the late 2nd millennium BC oracle bone script.The Vinča signs, found during excavations in Vinča, a suburb of Belgrade (Serbia), an evolution of simple symbols beginning in the 7th millennium BC, gradually increasing in complexity throughout the 6th millennium and culminating in the Tărtăria tablets of ca. 5300 BC with their rows of symbols carefully aligned, evoking the impression of a “text”.The Dispilio Tablet of the late 6th millennium is similar. The hieroglyphic scripts of the Ancient Near East seamlessly emerge from such symbol systems, so that it is difficult to say at what point precisely writing emerges from proto-writing. Adding to this difficulty is the fact that very little is known about the symbols’ meanings.

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The transition from proto-writing to the earliest fully developed writing systems took place in the late 4th to early 3rd millennium BC in the Fertile Crescent. The Kish tablet, dated to 3500 BC, reflects the stage of “proto-cuneiform”, when what would become the cuneiform script of Sumer was still in the proto-writing stage. By the end of the 4th millennium BC, this symbol system had evolved into a method of keeping accounts, using a round-shaped stylus impressed into soft clay at different angles for recording numbers. This was gradually augmented with pictographic writing using a sharp stylus to indicate what was being counted. The transitional stage to a writing system proper takes place in the Jemdet Nasr period (31st to 30th centuries BC). A similar development took place in the genesis of the Egyptian hieroglyphs. Various scholars believe that Egyptian hieroglyphs “came into existence a little after Sumerian script, and invented under the influence of the latter although it is pointed out a development of writing in Egypt
the Bronze Age, the cultures of the Ancient Near East had fully developed writing systems, while the marginal territories affected by the Bronze Age, viz. Europe, India and China, remained in the stage of proto-writing.

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The Chinese script emerges from proto-writing in the Chinese Bronze Age, during about the 14th to 11th centuries BC (Oracle bone script), while symbol systems native to Europe and India are extinct and replaced by descendants of the Semitic abjad during the Iron Age.
Typical “Indus script” seal impression showing an “inscription” of five characters.
The so-called Indus script is a symbol system used during the 3rd millennium BC in the Indus Valley Civilization.
With the exception of the Aegean, the early writing systems of the Near East did not reach Bronze Age Europe. The earliest writing systems of Europe arise in the Iron Age, derived from the Phoenician alphabet.

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The “Slavic runes” (7th/8th century) mentioned by a few medieval authors may have been such a system. The Quipu of the Incas (15th century), sometimes called “talking knots”, may have been of a similar nature. Another example is the system of pictographs invented by Uyaquk before the development of the Yugtun syllabary (ca. 1900).
Nsibidi is a system of symbols indigenous to what is now southeastern Nigeria. While there remains no commonly accepted exact date of origin, most researchers agree that use of the symbols date back well before 500 CE. There are thousands of Nsibidi symbols which were used on anything from calabashes to tattoos and to wall designs. Nsibidi is used for the Ekoid and Igboid languages, and the Aro people are known to write Nsibidi messages on the bodies of their messengers.

Storytelling is the conveying of events in words, and images, often by improvisation or embellishment. Stories or narratives have been shared in every culture as a means of entertainment, education, cultural preservation, and instilling moral values. Crucial elements of stories and storytelling include plot, characters, and narrative point of view. Storytelling predates writing, with the earliest forms of storytelling usually oral combined with gestures and expressions. In addition to being part of religious ritual, rock art may have served as a form of storytelling for many ancient cultures. The Australian aboriginal people painted symbols from stories on cave walls as a means of helping the storyteller remember the story. The story was then told using a combination of oral narrative, music, rock art, and dance, which bring understanding and meaning of human existence through remembrance and enactment of stories. People have used the carved trunks of living trees and ephemeral media to record stories in pictures or with writing. Complex forms of tattooing may also represent stories, with information about genealogy, affiliation, and social status.
With the advent of writing and the use of, portable media, stories were recorded, transcribed, and shared over wide regions of the world. Stories have been carved, scratched, painted, printed or inked onto wood or bamboo, ivory and other bones, pottery, clay tablets, stone, palm-leaf books, skins, bark cloth, paper, silk, canvas, and other textiles, recorded on film, and stored electronically in digital form. Oral stories continue to be committed to memory and passed from generation to generation, despite the increasing popularity of written and televised media in much of the world.

Eliments of a story
1 Plot is a literary term defined as the events that make up a story, as they relate to one another in a pattern, in a sequence, through cause and effect, One is generally interested in how well this pattern of events accomplishes some artistic or emotional effect. A complicated plot is called an imbroglio, but even the simplest statements of plot may include multiple inferences, as in traditional ballads.In other words, a plot is the gist of a story, and composed of causal events, which means a series of sentences linked by “and so.” A plot highlights all the important points and the line of a story.
2 a character requires an analysis of its relations with all of the other characters in the work. The individual status of a character is defined through the network of oppositions (proairetic, pragmatic, linguistic, proxemic) that it forms with the other characters.The relation between characters and the action of the story shifts historically, often miming shifts in society and its ideas about human individuality, self-determination, and the social order.
3 A narrator is either a personal character or a non-personal voice or images created by the author to deliver information to the audience about the plot and/or other information. something that merely relates the story to the audience without being involved in the actual events. Some stories have multiple narrators to illustrate the story-lines of various characters at the same, similar, or different times, thus allowing a more complex, non-singular point of view.
4 medium or Media are the collective communication outlets or tools that are used to store and deliver information or data.It is either associated with communication media, or the specialized communication businesses such as: print media and the press, photography, advertising, cinema, broadcasting (radio,television or the internet), and/or publishing.

Types of storys
Fiction is the form of any narrative that deals, in part or in whole, with information or events that are not real, but rather, imaginary—that is, invented by the author. Although the term fiction refers in particular to written stories such as novels and short stories, it may also refer to the theatre , film, television, poetry and song. Fiction contrasts with non-fiction, which deals exclusively with factual or, at least, assumed factual events, descriptions, observations.
Non-fiction, is a narrative that strictly presents presumably real-life events, established facts, and true information. The authors of such accounts believe them to be truthful at the time of their composition or, at least, pose them to a convinced audience as historically or empirically true. Reporting the beliefs of others in a non-fiction format is not necessarily an endorsement of the ultimate veracity of those beliefs, it is simply saying it is true that people believe them Non-fiction can also be written about fiction, giving information about these other works. Non-fiction need not necessarily be written text, since pictures and film can also purport to present a factual account of a subject.
Traditional stories, or stories about traditions, differ from both fiction and nonfiction in that the importance of transmitting the story’s worldview is generally understood to transcend an immediate need to establish its categorization as imaginary or factual. In the academic circles of literature, religion, history, and anthropology, categories of traditional story are important terminology to identify and interpret stories more precisely. Some stories belong in multiple categories and some stories do not fit into any category.
A fairy tale typically features European folkloric fantasy characters, such as dwarves, elves, fairies, giants, gnomes, goblins, mermaids, trolls, or witches, and usually magic or enchantments. Fairy tales may be distinguished from other folk narratives such as legends and explicitly moral tales, including beast fables.
the term is also used to describe something blessed with unusual happiness, as in “fairy tale ending” or “fairy tale romance” . Colloquially, a “fairy tale” or “fairy story” can also mean any farfetched story or tall tale; it is used especially of any story that not only is not true, but could not possibly be true. Legends are perceived as real; fairy tales may merge into legends, where the narrative is perceived both by teller and hearers as being grounded in historical truth. However, unlike legends and epics, they usually do not contain more than superficial references to religion and actual places, people, and events; they take place once upon a time rather than in actual times.
Folklore consists of legends, music, oral history, proverbs, jokes, popular beliefs, fairy tales, stories, tall tales, and customs included in the traditions of a culture, subculture, or group. It also includes the set of practices through which those expressive genres are shared.
Mythology can refer either to the collected myths of a group of people—their body of stories which they tell to explain nature, history, and customs—or to the study of such myths.As a collection of such stories, mythology is an important feature of every culture. Various origins for myths have been proposed, ranging from personification of natural phenomena to truthful or hyperbolic accounts of historical events, to explanations of existing ritual. Although the term is complicated by its implicit condescension, mythologizing is not just an ancient or primitive practice, as shown by contemporary mythopoeia such as urban legends and the expansive fictional mythoi created by fantasy novels and Japanese manga. A culture’s collective mythology helps convey belonging, shared and religious experience, behavioral models, and moral and practical lessons.
A legend, “things to be read” is a narrative of human actions that are perceived both by teller and listeners to take place within human history and to possess certain qualities that give the tale verisimilitude. Legend, for its active and passive participants includes no happenings that are outside the realm of “possibility”, as that is defined by a highly flexible set of parameters, which may include miracles that are perceived as actually having happened within the specific tradition of indoctrination where the legend arises, and within which tradition it may be transformed over time, in order to keep it fresh and vital, and realistic. Many legends operate within the realm of uncertainty, never being entirely believed by the participants, but also never being resolutely doubted.
Fable is a literary genre. A fable is a succinct fictional story, in prose or verse, that features animals, mythical creatures, plants, inanimate objects or forces of nature which are anthropomorphized (given human qualities such as verbal communication), and that illustrates or leads to an interpretation of a moral lesson (a “moral”), which may at the end be added explicitly in a pithy maxim.

Write or Draw to start your creation …
A storyboard is a graphic organizer in the form of illustrations or images displayed in sequence for the purpose of pre-visualizing a motion picture, animation, motion graphic or interactive media sequence. The storyboarding process, in the form it is known today, was developed at Walt Disney Productions during the early 1930s, after several years of similar processes being in use at Walt Disney and other animation studios.

A plot outline Points
•The teaser. This is a scene that pulls the reader in, preferably an action scene.
•Exposition/Background. Where is the setting? Who are the characters? This tells necessary information in order to follow along with the story.
•The conflict. Character(s) presented with a problem.
•Rising Action. The suspense grows, and the problems take the Ripple Effect into new problems, which, in turn, cause conflict for your character.
•Suspense. Right before the climactic scene. These are the events that lead up to the climax, which are crucial to make the story flow.
•Climax. Here is the scene where all of the problems blow up in one event, where your character is in the worst trouble. This is usually only a single event.
•Winding Down. Your character recovers from the incident in the climax, and things smooth out slightly. There are still problems but your character has recovered.
•Falling Action. All of the problems are untied, things settle in, and your character feels back to normal but usually impacted from the events that occurred.
•Resolution. A scene like an epilogue, that tells what your character is going through or will be going through in the future, and how they feel.
•End teaser (for series writers). Just like the teaser, but makes the reader want to read the next novel.
Fill in each plot point, and from there you are good.


New Fun of “The Digital Age”is you can just shoot and form the story in edditing or use Documentry style documentation to present numerious mediums usefull in art or education.

A Vintage Hat for the Holidays


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images-62 images-64 A disgraceful act to venture out of the house without a hat or even gloves. One record tells of a young lady venturing out to post a letter without her hat and gloves and being severely reprimanded for not being appropriately dressed. The post box was situated a few yards from her front garden gate. TMJS 24 Vintage Hat



Etiquette and formality have played their part in hat wearing.  At the turn of the 20th century in 1900, both men and women changed their hats dependant on their activity, but for many ladies of some social standing it would be several times a day.

   For hats, bearing in mind that hair was often pinned up, the popular style of hat wear were bonnets and fascinators, something you could pin on to your victory roll. Berets were also popular during the war.

    The snood – made popular by Vivien Leigh, would also create a nice 1940s war look effect to finish off your hairstyle. Just wearing a simple black beret with rolled hair can really give you that 1940s look.

 

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Plumassiers

Running parallel to these hat making arts were feather workshops or more correctly workshops called plumassiers where feathers were dyed and made into arrangements from boas to aigrettes to tufts and sprays for both the worlds of fashion and interiors.  Plumes have always been a status symbol and sign of economic stability.

Fortunes were paid by rich individuals for exotic feathered hats.  Gorgeous feathered hats could command as much as £100 in the early Edwardian era.  The Edwardians were masters in the art of excess and the flamboyant hats of the era are a clear example of this.

At one point whole stuffed birds were used to decorate hats, but as the new more enlightened century emerged, protests were voiced.  In America the Audubon society expressed concern and in England the RSPB (Royal Society for the Protection of Birds) campaigned for ecological understanding.

Eventually plumage pleas were heard and Queen Alexandra forbad the wearing of rare osprey feathers at court so that the osprey bird was not plundered for feathers.  For a few years magazines quietly ignored making reference to feathers on hats as women continued to wear them.  But soon the use of other rare bird feathers was banned and thereafter only farmed feathers could be used and only from specific birds.


For A Gentleman

Fun Hat 1940’s

A fashion report in Los Angeles Times from 1895 called the use of mendiant the “newest trimming” for hats, and noted that hats were “tipped far over the eyes”. The Chicago Tribune reported on fruit ribbons, along with feathers, flowers, and frills, as trim for Easter hats. A report on artificial fruit used on hats was in a 1918 edition of the New York Times. Fruit and vegetable trim on “gay hats” featured in the first millinery show of the season at New York’s Saks Fifth Avenue in 1941, and overshadowed flowers. Mendicant is a traditional French confection usually prepared during the Christmas season, and composed of a chocolate disk studded with nuts and dried fruits representing the four mendicant or monastic orders of the Dominicans, Augustinians, Franciscans and Carmelites, where the color of the nuts and dried fruits is used refer to the color of monastic robes. Tradition dictates that raisins are used for the Dominicans, hazelnut for the Augustins, dried fig for Franciscans and almond for Carmelite. Lil Picard, a millinery designer for the custom-made department of Bloomingdale’s, sought inspiration from nature for her hats and while on vacation “listening to the birds, gazing through the lacy outlines of foliage and watching the ripening fruits, she dreamed of trimmings.”

Perfect, BackSeams…”HowTo”

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Seamed: Stockings manufactured in the old Full-Fashioned manner with a seam running up the back of the leg. In the past they were manufactured by cutting the fabric and then sewing it together. Today stockings are generally fully knitted and a fake or mock seam is added up the back for a particular fashion look. Some brands also produce seamed hold-ups.
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Hosiery, also referred to as legwear, describes garments worn directly on the feet and legs. The term originated as the collective term for products of which a maker or seller is termed a hosier; and those products are also known generically as hose. The term is also used for all types of knitted fabric, and its thickness and weight is defined in terms of denier or opacity. Lower denier measurements of 5 to 15 describe a hose which may be sheer in appearance, whereas styles of 40 and above are dense, with little to no light able to come through on 100 denier items.

The first references to hosiery can be found in works of Hesiod, where Romans are said to have used leather or cloth in forms of strips to cover their lower body parts. Even the Egyptians are speculated to have used hosiery as socks have been found in certain tombs.

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Before the 1920s, women’s stockings, if worn, were worn for warmth. In the 1920s, as hemlines of women’s dresses rose, women began to wear stockings to cover the exposed legs. These stockings were sheer, first made of silk or rayon (then known as “artificial silk”), and after 1940 of nylon.
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Paint-on Hosiery During the War Years

A back “seam” drawn with an eyebrow pencil topped off the resourceful fashion effect
So it’s Saturday night in 1941, and you want to wear stockings with your cocktail dress, but the new wonder material nylon has been rationed for the war effort and has disappeared from department store shelves. What do you do in such times of patriotic privation? You get resourceful, and cover your legs with a layer of nude-colored makeup, and line the back of each leg with a trompe l’oeil seam.

Last week, in the first post from the Stocking Series, we heard about the huge reception of nylon hosiery. On May 16, 1940, officially called “Nylon Day,” four million pairs of nylons landed in stores and sold out within two days! But only a year later, the revolutionary product became scarce when the World War II economy directed all nylon into manufacturing parachutes, rope and netting.
Having trouble with your seam? No problem! This contraption, made from a screwdriver handle, bicycle leg clip and an ordinary eyebrow pencil would do the trick!

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HowTo Professionally Play Well With Others

Ep 19 TheMaryJaneStyle from TheMaryJaneStyle on Vimeo.

PROFESSIONAL ETIQUETTE GUIDE & HowTo NOT…

Manners are made up of trivialities of deportment which can be easily learned if one does not happen to know them; manner is personality—the outward manifestation of one’s innate character and attitude toward life…. Etiquette must, if it is to be of more than trifling use, include ethics as well as manners.

Certainly what one is, is of far greater importance than what one appears to be. -Emily Post

! Tips and tricks ”
Initiating Contact
1. Try to have a mutual acquaintance introduce you; builds your credibility
2. Aim for an in-person conversation rather than email exchange
3. In-person is most intimate, phone is moderate, and email is least personal
4. Seek to build a two-way relationship, rather than just ask for things

Email, voicemail, thank you notes
1. Keep emails brief; bullets are great for busy professionals; limit formatting since many professionals read emails on Blackberries (which destroys formatting)
2. Proof-read messages; spelling errors are a bad first impression
3. Be sure your contact information is included in every message
4. In voicemail, state your name clearly, reason for calling, what you would like the recipient to do, and how the action with benefit both parties
5. Send thank you notes with in 48 hours; write neatly on simple stationary, refer to specifics – an idea, conversation, or gift

Networking basics
1. Shake hands firmly; introduce yourself to most senior person in a group
2. Wear nametags on the right (when you extend to shake with right hand, it’s natural to look at the right side of their body.)
3. Introduce your acquaintances with thoughtful details
4. In conversation, listen more than speak; remember and use the speaker’s name
5. Focus on conversation; avoid wandering eyes or looking at guests or cell phone
6. Make a crisp but polite conclusion: “It has been a pleasure speaking with you.”
Meetings
1. Always show up on time, minimize distractions (computers, Blackberries)
2. Prepare materials beforehand 3. When leading a meeting: distribute an agenda, balance airtime (let everyone participate), conclude with clear to-dos and deadlines

Public address introductions
1. Never “wing” an introduction; request a biography of the speaker before hand. Good delivery of introduction is the best way to demonstrate your respect and appreciation.
2. If you tailor the introduction, review it with the speaker
3. Avoid humor, unless you are a) funny, b) situation calls for it, c) all will be comfortable
4. Avoid modesty; you are the speaker’s best chance to build credibility while maintaining humility. Share all the relevant accomplishments; make the audience want to listen!

Senior Presence
What is senior presence?
1. Some people in a room appear to be senior: they are mature, professional, responsible, authoritative (you can just tell they’re important)
2. Easy to identify by subtle signs
3. People who appear senior get more opportunities
4. Young professionals can learn to appear senior

Tips for senior presence
1. Appearance: Dress like the most senior person you regularly see, maintain good posture, smile easily, but not too often
2. Persona: Observe proper etiquette, maintain eye contact, don’t be afraid to disagree (confront difficult questions directly), and appear calm and controlled. Poise and maturity are displayed by not following the crowd meekly; share your idea if it’s contrary.
3. When speaking: Be clear and concise, avoid fillers (um, like), set the context for audience, use analogies and analysis, prepare a speech beforehand

Now HowTo NOT…
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1. Pushing in front of people
This indicates that you think your time is more important than other people. This is ultimately important in a live event ,show, or a public photo situation Don’t Block or Pull Focus This also counts on the road, on pavements, at the supermarket and in lines at the checkout. Letting others go ahead of you makes them feel special and that you are a person who cares. It’s such a little courtesy to extend to someone, and yet in today’s’ culture we are often made to feel that if we don’t trample over others, we’ll never get ahead. This is simply not true. Letting someone go ahead of you is a free way to make yourself feel great. Give it a try. Your heart will glow.

2. Being impatient
When things take longer than expected, some get angry. Sometimes we just have to wait for things to go our way, and sometimes the things we are waiting for never arrive. Never Rush a planned performance or talk down to cast members. some find this very hard to do, but when you are getting impatient, it pays to breathe deeply, relax your shoulders and concentrate on the internal emotions you are feeling inside, and try to let them wash over you like a wave, without reacting to your emotions in a negative way.

3. Talking too loudly
when others are speaking or on public transport, at cafes. in the office and I like it drives people nuts. I have a loud, clear voice that can be heard even when I am not yelling. I need to make more of an effort to respect the space of those in my general vicinity. No one wants to hear everything I have to say, despite the fact that I find myself so interesting.

4. Forgetting to say please and thank you
this piece of etiquette advice, can be forgiven every now and then, forgetting to say please and thank you. It’s one of the first things ever taught. In some situations a power play of the one in control never has to say please and thank you to remain in charge (these people have serious issues CAUTION)

5. Talking endlessly about yourself
Yes, we all need to share sometimes, but there comes a point where we have to say ‘enough is enough’. I like to talk about myself, in fact, we all do. However, it should be the other people in the room that you are trying to get to know. So shut up for once.

6. Not listening to other people
You know the friend whose eyes glaze over whenever the conversation drifts off them? These are the worst types of people to know. One of the most valuable things you can do for people is to LISTEN to them! This is more valuable than anything else, don’t you think?

7. Interrupting
Sometimes people think they just can’t seem to wait to get the point across they will talk fast in longwinded story’s hard to follow and rambling to say “LOOK AT ME” this is a good time to interrupt – I just have to interrupt what you are saying to talk over the top of you. This is simply rude and can be avoided –share a conversation is only good if everyone is sharing in a nice flow it might take practice but it shows respect friendship and that your intelligent!


The Mary Jane Style HowTo-Ep#18 Might seem silly Topic is june13,1934


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The Best preparation of The Future is knowledge of The Past

Topic is June13,1934 Production Code followed by any filmmaker who would want Theatrical distribution = censorship Is there a separation of church and state… what was artistic freedom from 1934-1968… At the end of the video I added a little funny impression of not all but, a sample of possible working environment very different from Todays
The last decade or more there has been minimum censorship at least here on the internet I choose this topic due to questions or concerns on how is the internet going to be censored or monitored… this video is simply the reading of The …
The Motion Picture Production Code was the set of industry moral censorship guidelines that governed the production of most United States motion pictures released by major studios from 1930 to 1968.
It is also popularly known as the Hays Code, after Hollywood’s chief censor of the time, Will H. Hays. The Motion Pictures Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA), which later became the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), adopted the code in 1930, began enforcing it in 1934, and abandoned it in 1968, in favor of the subsequent MPAA film rating system.
The Production Code spelled out what was acceptable and what was unacceptable content for motion pictures produced for a public audience in the United States. The office enforcing it was popularly called the Hays Office in reference to Hays, inaccurately so after 1934 when Joseph Breen took over from Hays, creating the Breen Office, which was far more rigid in censoring films than Hays had been.
Where Did this idea come from?  In 1922, after several risqué films and a series of off-screen scandals involving Hollywood stars, the studios enlisted Presbyterian elder Will H. Hays to rehabilitate Hollywood’s image. Hollywood in the 1920s was expected to be somewhat corrupt, and many felt the movie industry had always been morally questionable. Political pressure was increasing, with legislators in 37 states introducing almost one hundred movie censorship bills in 1921. Hays was paid the then-lavish sum of $100,000 a year. Hays, Postmaster General under Warren G. Harding and former head of the Republican National Committee, served for 25 years as president of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA), where he “defended the industry from attacks, recited soothing nostrums, and negotiated treaties to cease hostilities.”
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The move mimicked the decision Major League Baseball had made in hiring judge Kennesaw Mountain Landis as League Commissioner the previous year to quell questions about the integrity of baseball in the wake of the 1919 World Series gambling scandal; The New York Times even called Hays the “screen Landis”.
In 1924, Hays introduced a set of recommendations dubbed “The Formula” which the studios were advised to heed, and asked filmmakers to describe to his office the plots of pictures they were planning on making. The Supreme Court had already decided unanimously in 1915 in Mutual Film Corporation v. Industrial Commission of Ohio that free speech did not extend to motion pictures, and while there had been token attempts to clean up the movies before—such as when the studios formed the National Association of the Motion Picture Industry (NAMPI) in 1916—little had come of the efforts.

New York became the first state to take advantage of the Supreme Court’s decision by instituting a censorship board in 1921. Virginia followed suit the following year, with eight individual states having a board by the advent of sound film, But many of these were ineffectual. By the 1920s, the New York stage—a frequent source of subsequent screen material—had topless shows, performances filled with curse words, mature subject matters, and sexually suggestive dialogue. Early in the sound system conversion process, it became apparent that what might be acceptable in New York would not be so in Kansas.

In 1927, Hays suggested to studio executives that they form a committee to discuss film censorship. Irving G. Thalberg of Metro Goldwyn Mayer (MGM), Sol Wetzel of Fox, and E. H. Allen of Paramount responded by collaborating on a list they called the “Don’ts and Be careful”, which was based on items that were challenged by local censor boards. This list consisted of eleven subjects best avoided and twenty-six to be handled very carefully. The list was approved by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), and Hays created the Studio Relations Committee (SRC) to oversee its implementation. However, there was still no way to enforce tenets. The controversy surrounding film standards came to a head in 1929

In 1929, the lay Catholic Martin Quigley (editor of the prominent trade paper Motion Picture Herald) and the Jesuit priest Father Daniel A. Lord created a code of standards and submitted it to the studios. The Lord was particularly concerned with the effects of sound film on children, whom he considered especially susceptible to their allure. In February 1930, several studio heads—including Irving Thalberg of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)—met with Lord and Quigley. After some revisions, they agreed to the stipulations of the Code. One of the main motivating factors in adopting the Code was to avoid direct government intervention. It was the responsibility of the SRC (headed by Colonel Jason S. Joy, a former American Red Cross Executive Secretary) to supervise film production and advise the studios when changes or cuts were required. On March 31, the MPPDA agreed that it would abide by the Code.

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The code was divided into two parts. The first was a set of “general principles” which mostly concerned morality.
The second was a set of “particular applications” which was an exacting list of items which could not be depicted. Some restrictions, such as the ban on homosexuality or on the use of specific curse words, were never directly mentioned, but were assumed to be understood without clear demarcation. Depiction of miscegenation (i.e. marital or sexual relations between different races) was forbidden. It also stated that the notion of an “adults-only policy” would be a dubious, ineffective strategy which would be difficult to enforce. However, it did allow that “maturer minds may easily understand and accept without harm subject matter in plots which does younger people positive harm.” If children were supervised and the events implied elliptically, the code allowed “the possibility of a cinematically inspired thought crime.”

The production code sought not only to determine what could be portrayed on screen but also to promote traditional values. Sexual relations outside of marriage—which were forbidden from being portrayed as attractive or beautiful—were to be presented in a way that would not arouse passion or make them seem permissible.
All criminal action had to be punished, and neither the crime nor the criminal could elicit sympathy from the audience, or the audience must at least be aware that such behavior is wrong, usually through “compensating moral value”.
Authority figures had to be treated with respect, and the clergy could not be portrayed as comic characters or villains. Under some circumstances, politicians, police officers, and judges could be villains, as long as it was clear that those individuals portrayed as villains were the exceptions to the rule.

The entire document was written with Catholic undertones and stated that art must be handled carefully because it could be “morally evil in its effects” and because its “deep moral significance” was unquestionable. It was initially decided to keep the Catholic influence on the Code secret. A recurring theme was “that throughout, the audience feels sure that evil is wrong and good is right”. The Code also contained an addendum commonly referred to as the Advertising Code which regulated advertising copy and imagery.
The first film the office reviewed, The Blue Angel, which was passed by Joy with no revisions, was considered indecent by a California censor. Although there were several instances where Joy negotiated cuts from films and there were indeed definite—albeit loose—constraints, a significant amount of lurid material made it to the screen. Joy had to review 500 films a year with a small staff and little power. He was more willing to work with the studios, and his creative writing skills led to his hiring at Fox. On the other hand, Wingate struggled to keep up with the flood of scripts coming in, to the point where Warner Bro.’s head of production Darryl Zanuck wrote him a letter imploring him to pick up the pace.
In 1930, the Hays office did not have the authority to order studios to remove material from a film, and instead worked by reasoning and sometimes pleading with them. Complicating matters, the appeals process ultimately put the responsibility for making the final decision in the hands of the studios.

One factor in ignoring the code was the fact that some found such censorship prudish, due to the libertine social attitudes of the 1920s and early 1930s. This was a period in which the Victorian era was sometimes ridiculed as being naïve and backward. When the Code was announced, liberal periodical The Nation attacked it.

The publication stated that if crime were never to be presented in a sympathetic light, then taken literally that would mean that “law” and “justice” would become one and the same. Therefore, events such as the Boston Tea Party could not be portrayed. If clergy must always be presented in a positive way, then hypocrisy could not be dealt with either. The Outlook agreed, and, unlike Variety, The Outlook predicted from the beginning that the Code would be difficult to enforce. The Great Depression of the 1930s led many studios to seek income by any way possible. Since films containing racy and violent content resulted in high ticket sales, it seemed reasonable to continue producing such films. Soon, the flouting of the code became an open secret. In 1931, the Hollywood Reporter mocked the code and Variety followed suit in 1933. In the same year as the Variety article, a noted screenwriter stated that “the Hays moral code is not even a joke any more; it’s just a memory.”

On June 13, 1934, an amendment to the Code was adopted which established the Production Code Administration (PCA) and required all films released on or after July 1, 1934, to obtain a certificate of approval before being released. The PCA had two offices—one in Hollywood and the other in New York City. The first film to receive an MPPDA seal of approval was The World Moves On. For more than thirty years, virtually all motion pictures produced in the United States adhered to the code. The Production Code was not created or enforced by federal, state, or city government; the Hollywood studios adopted the code in large part in the hopes of avoiding government censorship, preferring self-regulation to government regulation. The enforcement of the Production Code led to the dissolution of many local censorship boards.

 

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Hollywood worked within the confines of the Production Code until the late 1950s and the movies were faced with very serious competitive threats. The first threat came from a new technology, television, which did not require Americans to leave their house to watch moving pictures. Hollywood needed to offer the public something it could not get on television, which itself was under an even more restrictive censorship code.

In addition to the threat of television, there was also increasing competition from foreign films, such as
Vittorio De Sica’s Bicycle Thieves (1948),
the Swedish film One Summer of Happiness (1951),
and Ingmar Bergman’s Summer with Monika (1953).
Vertical integration in the movie industry had been found to violate anti-trust laws, and studios had been forced to give up ownership of theatres by the Supreme Court in United States v. Paramount Pictures, Inc. (1948). The studios had no way to keep foreign films out, and foreign films were not bound by the Production Code. (For De Sica’s film, there was a censorship controversy when the MPAA demanded a scene where the lead characters talk to the prostitutes of a brothel be removed, regardless of the fact that there was no sexual or provocative activity.) Some British films—such as
Victim (1961),
A Taste of Honey (1961),
and The Leather Boys (1963)
—challenged traditional gender roles and openly confronted the prejudices against homosexuals, all in clear violation of the Hollywood Production Code. In keeping with the changes in society, sexual content that would have previously been banned by the Code was being retained. The anti-trust rulings also helped pave the way for independent art houses that would show films created by people such as Andy Warhol who worked outside the studio system.

In 1952, in the case of Joseph Burstyn, Inc. v. Wilson, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously overruled its 1915 decision
(Mutual Film Corporation v. Industrial Commission of Ohio) and held that motion pictures were entitled to First Amendment protection, so that the New York State Board of Regents could not ban
“The Miracle”, a short film that was one half of L’Amore (1948),
an anthology film directed by Roberto Rossellini. Film distributor Joseph Burstyn released the film in the U.S. in 1950, and the case became known as the “Miracle Decision” due to its connection to Rossellini’s film. That reduced the threat of government regulation, which had formerly been cited as justification for the Production Code, and the PCA’s powers over the Hollywood industry were greatly reduced.

By the 1950s, American culture also began to change. A boycott by the National Legion of Decency no longer guaranteed a film’s commercial failure, and several aspects of the code had slowly lost their taboo. In 1956, areas of the code were rewritten to accept subjects such as miscegenation, adultery, and prostitution. For example, the remake of a pre-Code film dealing with prostitution, Anna Christie, was cancelled by MGM twice, in 1940 and in 1946, as the character of Anna was not allowed to be portrayed as a prostitute. By 1962, such subject matter was acceptable and the original film was given a seal of approval.

By the late 1950s, increasingly explicit films began to appear, such as
Anatomy of a Murder (1959),
Suddenly Last Summer (1959),
and The Dark at the Top of the Stairs (1961).
The MPAA reluctantly granted the seal of approval for these films, although not until certain cuts were made. Due to its themes, Billy Wilder’s
Some Like It Hot (1959)
was not granted a certificate of approval, but it still became a box office smash, and, as a result, it further weakened the authority of the Code. At the forefront of contesting the Code was director Otto Preminger, whose films violated the Code repeatedly in the 1950s.
His 1953 film The Moon Is Blue — about a young woman who tries to play two suitors off against each other by claiming that she plans to keep her virginity until marriage — was released without a certificate of approval. He later made
The Man with the Golden Arm (1955),
which portrayed the prohibited subject of drug abuse, and
Anatomy of a Murder (1959), which dealt with murder and rape.
Like Some Like It Hot, Preminger’s films were direct assaults on the authority of the Production Code, and their success hastened its abandonment. In the early 1960s, films began to deal with adult subjects and sexual matters that had not been seen in Hollywood films since the early 1930s. The MPAA reluctantly granted the seal of approval for these films, although again not until certain cuts were made.

In 1964, the Holocaust film The Pawnbroker, directed by Sidney Lumet and starring Rod Steiger, was initially rejected because of two scenes in which the actresses Linda Geiser and Thelma Oliver fully expose their breasts, as well as due to a sex scene between Oliver and Jaime Sánchez described as “unacceptably sex suggestive and lustful”. Despite the rejection, the film’s producers arranged for Allied Artists to release the film without the Production Code seal, with the New York censors licensing the film without the cuts demanded by Code administrators. The producers appealed the rejection to the Motion Picture Association of America.
On a 6–3 vote, the MPAA granted the film an exception conditional on “reduction in the length of the scenes which the Production Code Administration found unprovable.” The requested reductions of nudity were minimal; the outcome was viewed in the media as a victory for the film’s producers.
The Pawnbroker
was the first film featuring bare breasts to receive Production Code approval. The exception to the code was granted as a “special and unique case” and was described by The New York Times at the time as “an unprecedented move that will not, however, set a precedent”. However, in Pictures at a Revolution, Mark Harris’ 2008 study of films during that era, Harris wrote that the MPAA approval was “the first of a series of injuries to the Production Code that would prove fatal within three years.”

In 1966, Warner Bros. released Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, the first film to feature the “Suggested for Mature Audiences” (SMA) label. When Jack Valenti became President of the MPAA in 1966, he was faced with censoring the film’s explicit language. Valenti negotiated a compromise: the word “screw” was removed, but other language remained, including the phrase “hump the hostess”. The film received Production Code approval despite the previously prohibited language.

That same year, the British-produced, American-financed film Blowup was denied Production Code approval. MGM released it anyway, the first instance of an MPAA member company distributing a film that did not have an approval certificate. That same year, the original and lengthy code was replaced by a list of eleven points. The points outlined that the boundaries of the new code would be current community standards and good taste. In addition, any film containing content deemed to be suitable for older audiences would feature the label SMA in its advertising. With the creation of this new label, the MPAA unofficially began classifying films.
By the late 1960s, enforcement had become impossible and the Production Code was abandoned entirely. The MPAA began working on a rating system, under which film restrictions would lessen. The MPAA film rating system went into effect on November 1, 1968, with four ratings: G for general audiences, M for mature content, R for restricted (under 17 not admitted without an adult), and X for sexually explicit content. By the end of 1968, Geoffrey Shurlock stepped down from his post.[50][51] In 1969, the Swedish film I Am Curious (Yellow), directed by Vilgot Sjöman, was initially banned in the U.S. for its frank depiction of sexuality; however, this was overturned by the Supreme Court.

In 1970, because of confusion over the meaning of “mature audiences”, the M rating was changed to GP, and then in 1972 to the current PG, for “parental guidance suggested”. In 1984, in response to public complaints regarding the severity of horror elements in PG-rated titles such as Gremlins and Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, the PG-13 rating was created as a middle tier between PG and R. In 1990, the X rating was replaced by NC-17 (under 17 not admitted), partly because of the stigma associated with the X rating, and partly because the X rating was not trademarked by the MPAA; pornographic bookstores and theaters were using their own X and XXX symbols to market products.


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HowTo Apply Vintage Nylons, Stockings or Fine Hosiery






The Mary Jane Style Today, Dressing in classic vintage pin up attire “HowTo” Apply Authentic stockings warn from Picturesque* Designer vintage nylons sheer with nude back seam ,keyhole top and dainty black ankle design with jewels there is quite a History in Hosery.Dress your legs elegantly so you are always dressed to kill
First a must is…
A garter belt, or suspender belt or suspenders, is the most common way of holding up stockings. It is a piece of lingerie worn around the waist like a belt which has “suspenders” or “stays” that clip to the tops of the stockings to hold them in place.
The History of the very Nylons you see in this tutorial…
The name of the new discovery, nylon, came from DuPont entering it in the New York World Fair in 1939. Ny(-lon) is the abbreviation for New York. The publicity was a hit and the basic products were advertised
Stockings were typically silk and pricey. When nylon stockings became available (May 15, 1940), DuPont sold nearly 800,000 the first day. By the end of the first year, 64 million stockings had been sold. They were still being produced the same as the silk stockings–”fully-fashioned” with hand-sewn backs.
A stocking frame was a mechanical knitting machine used in the textiles industry. It was invented by William Lee of Calverton near Nottingham in 1589. Its use, known traditionally as framework knitting, was the first major stage in the mechanisation of the textile industry, and played an important part in the early history of the Industrial Revolution.
By 1598 he was able to knit stockings from silk,A thriving business built up with the exiled Huguenot silk-spinners who had settled in the village of Spitalfields just outside the city. In 1663, the London Company of Framework Knitters was granted a charter. By about 1785, however, demand was rising for cheaper stockings made of cotton. The frame was adapted but became too expensive for individuals to buy, thus wealthy men bought the machines and hired them out to the knitters, providing the materials and buying the finished product. With increasing competition, they ignored the standards set by the Chartered Company. Frames were introduced to Leicester by Nicholas Alsop in around 1680, who encountered resistance and at first worked secretly in a cellar in Northgate Street, taking his own sons and the children of near relatives as apprentices.
In 1728, the Nottingham magistrates refused to accept the authority of the London Company, and the centre of the trade moved northwards to Nottingham, which also had a lace making industry.
The breakthrough with cotton stockings, however, came in 1758 when Jedediah Strutt introduced an attachment for the frame which produced what became known as the “Derby Rib”. The Nottingham frameworkers found themselves increasingly short of raw materials. Initially they used thread spun in India, but this was expensive and required doubling. Lancashire yarn was spun for fustian and varied in texture. They tried spinning cotton themselves but, being used to the long fibres of wool, experienced great difficulty. Meanwhile, the Gloucester spinners, who had been used to a much shorter wool, were able to handle cotton and their frameworkers were competing with the Nottingham producers.
Before the 1920s, women’s stockings, if worn, were worn for warmth. In the 1920s, as hemlines of women’s dresses rose, women began to wear stockings to cover the exposed legs. These stockings were sheer, first made of silk or rayon (then known as “artificial silk”),
In modern usage, stocking specifically refers to the form of women’s hosiery configured as two pieces, one for each leg (except for American and Australian English, where the term can also be a synonym pantyhose). The term hold-ups and thigh highs refers to stockings that stay up by the use of built-in elastic, while the word stockings is the general term or refers to the kind of stockings that need a suspender belt (garter belt, in American English), and are quite distinct from tights or pantyhose (American English).
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Hosiery Style Definitions
Cuban heel: A stocking with a heel made with folded over and sewn reinforcement.

Demi-toe: Stockings which have a reinforced toe with half the coverage on top as on the bottom. This results in a reinforcement that covers only the tip of the toes as opposed to the whole toe. These can be with or without a reinforced heel.

Denier: The lower the denier number the sheerer the garment. Stockings knitted with a higher denier tend to be less sheer but more durable.

Fishnet: Knitted stockings with a very wide open knit resembling a fish net.

Fencenet: Similar to fishnet, but with a much wider pattern. These are sometimes worn over another pair of stockings or pantyhose, such as matte or opaque, with a contrasting colour. Sometimes referred to as whalenets.

Full Fashioned: Fully fashioned stockings are knitted flat, the material is then cut and the two sides are then united by a seam up the back. Fully fashioned stockings were the most popular style until the 1960s.

Hold-ups (British English) or Stay-ups: Stockings that are held up by sewn-in elasticated bands (quite often a wide lace top band). In the US they are referred to as thigh-highs.

Knee-Highs: Stockings that terminate at or just barely below the knee. Also known as half-stockings, trouser socks, or socks.

Matte: Stockings which have a dull or non-lustre finish.

Mock seam: A false seam sewn into the back of a seamless stocking.

Nude heel: Stockings without reinforcement in the heel area.

Opaque: Stockings made of yarn which give them a heavier appearance (usually 40 denier or greater).

Point heel: in a Fully Fashioned stocking it is a heel in which the reinforced part ends in a triangle shape.

RHT: Abbreviation of reinforced heel and toe.

Open-toed: Stockings that stop at the base of the toe with a piece that goes between the first and second toes to hold them down. They can be worn with some open-toed shoes, especially to show off pedicured toes.

Sandalfoot: Stockings with a nude toe, meaning no heavier yarn in the toe than is in the leg. They are conceived to be worn with sandal or open-toe shoes.

Seamed: Stockings manufactured in the old Full-Fashioned manner with a seam running up the back of the leg. In the past they were manufactured by cutting the fabric and then sewing it together. Today stockings are generally fully knitted and a fake or mock seam is added up the back for a particular fashion look. Some brands also produce seamed hold-ups.

Seamless: Stockings knit in one operation on circular machines (one continuous operation) so that no seaming is required up the back.

Sheers: Stockings generally of a 15 to 20 denier.

Thigh-Highs: Stockings that terminate somewhere in the mid-thigh.

Garter’s
Suspender belt (British English) or Garter belt (American Eglish): a belt with straps to keep stockings (not hold-ups) on place: usually they have 4 straps, but may have also 6 or 8.
Ultra Sheer: A fine denier fiber which gives the ultimate in sheerness. Usually 10 denier.
Welt[disambiguation needed]: A fabric knitted separately and machine-sewn to the top of a stocking. Knit in a heavier denier yarn and folded double to give strength for supporter fastening.

// ]]>nylons o
These Jewels vintage stockings in nude from Picturesque
are a great take on the classic stocking featuring an erray of heat fixed white luxury crystals on 15 denier nylon.
These nylons are a silky 100% Nylon and 60 Gauge.
Non stretching original form fitting, First Quality. Ultra Sexy !
They are old/new stock and wrapped in original tissue paper and comes with there original Picturesque Box.
A great item to wear or collect ! Made in USA by Sanson Hosiery Mills Inc.
These fabulously sexy nylon stockings are new/old stock and unworn.
The Nylon Stockings are in mint condition.
The Box have age marks and are not 100% perfect.
These nylon stockings are circa 40 – 50 years old and very extremely rare.


LOVE How To Puppet Show Valentine Special


My Happy Valentines Day Puppet Show!!!

Video Part 1 includes
The Basic Elements of A Puppet Show

First : A Script/Text, Scenario, Plan:

This is the starting point of the Puppet Show theatrical performance. The element most often considered as the domain of the playwright in Puppet Show theatre.
The Puppet Show playwright’s script is the text by which theatre is created.
It can be simplistic, as in the 16th century, with the scenarios used by the acting troupes of the Commedia dell’ arte,
or it can be elaborate, such as the works of William Shakespeare. The script, scenario, or plan is what the director uses as a blue print to build a Puppet Show production from.

The Process for A Puppet Show:

This is the coordination of the creative efforts usually headed up in Puppet Show theatre by the Puppet Show director.
It is the pure process by which the Puppet Show playwright’s work is brought to realization by the Puppet Show director,
actors, designers, technicians, dancers, musicians, and any other collaborators that come together on the script, scenario, or plan.
This is the works in progress stage of the Puppet Show.

The Product:A Puppet Show

This is the end result of the process of work involved in the Puppet Show.
The final product Puppet Show that results from all of the labors coming together to complete the finished work of Puppet Show script, scenario, and plan,
in union with all of the collaborators in the Puppet Show process to create the final product.
This is what the audience will witness as they sit in the Puppet Show theatre and view the work.

The Audience:

Puppet Show Theatre requires an audience.
For all of the arts public is essential.
The physical presence of an audience can change a Puppet Show performance, inspire actors, and create expectations.
Puppet Show Theatre is a living breathing art form. The presence of live Puppet Show actors on the stage in front of live Puppet Show audiences sets it apart from modern day films and television.

Let us now look to the person who is responsible for the starting point of the Puppet Show theatrical event. The initial Puppet Show creator of the script, scenario, or plan, as outlined above.
This person is the Puppet Show playwright. A Puppet Show playwright works in that branch of literature dealing with the writing and producing of Puppet Show plays for the Puppet Show theatre.
The literary composition that is written specifically for the Puppet Show stage in play format by the Puppet Show playwright.

The Puppet Show Playwright
The basic steps involved in the development of Puppet Show drama include:

1. Coming up with Puppet Show Thought/Theme/Ideas to be expressed through the work.

2. Determine the Genre and Style of the Puppet Show work

3. Outlining Basic Action of the Puppet Show work and Creating Plot.

4. Establish the Structure of the Puppet Show Play and Overall Framework

5. The Development of Characters presented in the Puppet Show work.

6. The Creation of Dialogue and the Language of the Puppet Show Characters.

7. Creating Puppet Show Music: This can involve the Rhythm of the Language or actual Music Composition and the Lyrics of the Puppet Show songs.

8. Establishing Puppet Show Spectacle: The visual and Environmental elements of the Puppet Show work.

9. Research of Subject Matter and Relevant issues presented in the Puppet Show play.

1. Puppet Show Thought/Theme/Ideas

What the Puppet Show play means as opposed to what happens (the plot).
Sometimes the theme is clearly stated in the Puppet Show title. It may be stated through Puppet Show dialogue by a Puppet Show character acting as the Puppet Show playwright’s voice.
Or it may be the Puppet Show theme is less obvious and emerges only after some study or thought.
The Puppet Show abstract issues and feelings that grow out of the Puppet Show dramatic action.

2. Puppet Show Action/Plot

The events of a Puppet Show play; the Puppet Show story as opposed to the Puppet Show theme; what happens rather than what it means.
The Puppet Show plot must have some sort of unity and clarity by setting up a Puppet Show pattern by which each action initiating the next rather than standing alone without connection to what came before it or what follows.
In the Puppet Show plot of a Puppet Show play, Puppet Show characters are involved in conflict that has a pattern of movement. The action and movement in the Puppet Show play begins from the initial entanglement,
through rising action, climax, and falling action to Puppet Show resolution.

3. Puppet Show Characters

These are the Puppet Show people presented in the Puppet Show play that are involved in the perusing the Puppet Show plot. Each Puppet Show character should have their own distinct personality, age, appearance, beliefs,
socio economic background, and language.

4. Puppet Show Language

The Puppet Show word choices made by the Puppet Show playwright and the enunciation of the actors of the language. Puppet Show Language and dialog delivered by the Puppet Show characters moves the Puppet Show plot and action along,
provides the Puppet Show exposition, defines the distinct Puppet Show characters. Each Puppet Show playwright can create their own specific Puppet Show style in relationship to language choices they use in establishing Puppet Show
character and dialogue.

5. Puppet Show Music

Puppet Show Music can encompass the rhythm of dialogue and speeches in a Puppet Show play or can also mean the aspects of the melody and music compositions as with musical Puppet Show theatre.
Each Puppet Show theatrical presentation delivers music, rhythm and melody in its own distinctive manner. Puppet Show Music is not a part of every Puppet Show play. But, Puppet Show music can be included to mean all sounds in a
Puppet Show production. Puppet Show Music can expand to all sound effects, the Puppet Show actor’s voices, songs, and instrumental music played as underscore in a Puppet Show play. Puppet Show Music creates patterns and establishes
tempo in Puppet Show theatre. In the aspects of the Puppet Show musical the Puppet Show songs are used to push the Puppet Show plot forward and move the Puppet Show story to a higher level of intensity. Puppet Show Composers and
lyricist work together with Puppet Show playwrights to strengthen the themes and ideas of the Puppet Show play. Puppet Show Character’s wants and desires can be strengthened for the audience through Puppet Show lyrics and music.

6. Puppet Show Spectacle

Puppet Show Point of Attack

The moment of the Puppet Show play at which the main action of the Puppet Show plot begins. This may occur in the first scene of the Puppet Show , or it may occur after several scenes of exposition.
The point of attack is the main Puppet Show action by which all others will arise. It is the point at which the main Puppet Show complication is introduced. Puppet Show Point of attack can sometimes works
hand in hand with a Puppet Show’s inciting incident, which is the first incident leading to the rising action of the Puppet Show . Sometimes the inciting incident is an event that occurred somewhere in the Puppet Show character’s
past and is revealed to the Puppet Show audience through exposition.

Puppet Show Exposition

Puppet Show Exposition is important information that the Puppet Show audience needs to know in order to follow the Puppet Show main story line of the Puppet Show play. It is the aspects of the Puppet Show story that the Puppet Show
audience may hear about but that they will not witness in actual Puppet Show scenes. It encompasses the past actions of the Puppet Show characters before the Puppet Show play’s opening Puppet Show scenes progress.

Puppet Show Rising Action

Puppet Show Rising action is the section of the Puppet Show plot beginning with the point of attack and/or inciting Puppet Show incident and proceeding forward to the crisis onto the Puppet Show climax. The action of the Puppet Show
will rise as it set up a situation of increasing intensity and anticipation. These Puppet Show scenes make up the body of the Puppet Show and usually create a sense of continuous mounting suspense in the Puppet Show audience.

The Puppet Show Climax/Crisis

All of the earlier scenes and actions in a Puppet Show will build technically to the highest level of dramatic intensity. This section of the Puppet Show is generally referred to as the moment of the Puppet Show climax.
This is the moment where the major dramatic Puppet Show questions rise to the highest level, the mystery hits the unraveling point, and the Puppet Show culprits are revealed. This should be the point of the highest Puppet Show stage
of dramatic intensity in the action of the Puppet Show . The whole combined actions of the Puppet Show generally lead up to this moment.

Puppet Show Resolution/Obligatory Puppet Show Scene

The Puppet Show resolution is the moment of the Puppet Show in which the Puppet Show conflicts are resolved. It is the solution to the conflict in the Puppet Show , the answer to the Puppet Show mystery, and the clearing up of the
final details. This is the Puppet Show scene that answers the questions raised earlier in the Puppet Show. In this Puppet Show scene the methods and motives are revealed to the Puppet Show audience.

The Puppet Show spectacle in the Puppet Show theatre can involve all of the aspects of Puppet Show scenery, costumes, and special effects in a Puppet Show production. The visual elements of the Puppet Show created for the Puppet Show
theatrical event. The qualities determined by the Puppet Show playwright that create the world and atmosphere of the Puppet Show play for the Puppet Show audience’s eye.

Climatic Puppet Show Structure

I. Puppet Show Plot begins late in story, closer to the very end or climax

II. Covers a short space of time, perhaps a few hours, or at most a few days

III. Contains a few solid, extended Puppet Show scenes, such as three acts with each act comprising one long scene

IV. Puppet Show Occurs in a restricted locale, one room or one house

V. Number of Puppet Show characters is severely limited, usually not more than six or eight

VI. Puppet Show Plot in linear and moves in a single line with few subplots or counter plots

VII. Line of Puppet Show action proceeds in a cause and effect chain. The Puppet Show characters and events are closely linked in a sequence of logical, almost inevitable development

Episodic Puppet Show Structure

I. Puppet Show Plot begins relatively early in the Puppet Show story and moves through a series of episodes

II. Puppet Show Covers a longer period of time: weeks, months, and sometimes years

III. Many short, fragmented scenes; sometimes an alternation of short and long scenes

IV. Puppet Show May range over an entire city or even several countries

V. Profusion of Puppet Show characters, sometimes several dozen

VI. Frequently marked by several threads of Puppet Show action, such as two parallel plots, or scenes of comic relief in a serous Puppet Show

VII. Puppet Show Scenes are juxtaposed tone to one another. An event may result from several causes, or no apparent cause, but arises in a network or web of Puppet Show circumstances

Puppet Show Conclusion

Artistic consideration in the Puppet Show playwriting requires selection and arrangement. Puppet Show Art is skill acquired by experience, study, and clear observations.
Puppet Show Playwrights must consciously set about making choices with a competent plan and creative imagination. Only then than we consider the Puppet Show playwrights work as a viable start to the Puppet Show theatrical process.
Before anyone begins to write a Puppet Show it is important to understand the medium for which you intend on writing. Writing for the Puppet Show stage demands an understanding of two fundamentals:
the essence of Puppet Show drama and the nature of Puppet Show theatre.

Video 2 :The Example… A Valentine Puppet Show by Maryjane a professional puppeteer!!!
TMJS V puppet show
Happy Valentines Day!!!
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